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July 2017
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The Complicit Media

While it comes as no surprise that most so-called “journalists” are left-leaning liberals (some 85% of them are registered Democratics), it is interesting to see just how out-of-touch they are. Although there has been a slight shift over the course of the past decade,  the graph here remains illustrative. For a better view. visit http://www.journalism.org/node/2304

Of particular interest has been the recent renaissance of citizen journalists, who have come into being largely as a means of countering the role of mainstream media as PR flacks for Democrats. The mainstream media, overwhelmingly liberal Democrat voters, have been instrumental in furthering the Democratic agenda of distortion, obfuscation, and when necessary, lying to to the American public; therefore, a resurgence of citizen journalists has occurred in order to create a much-needed counterweight, and to provide a venue for the distribution of factual content which the mainstream media have demonstrated that they are not only unwilling, but incapable of, providing.

My good friend over at TMI proffered an interesting – and entirely accurate – observation:  How words are used, and what they mean, are important. Just recently it was pointed out that when The Media talks about Republicans, the words Republicans choose to utter are “claims.” As in, “Republicans claim that reducing regulations will result in increase private sector investment and jobs.” When reporting on Democrats, the words Democrats choose to utter are “beliefs.” Such as, “Democrats believe such claims are false.

In every way possible, MSM indoctrinates, rather than informs.

They are not in the business of news; they are in the business of propaganda.

As noted plagiarist Jonathan Nicholas stated, during the course of an interview looking back over his years as columnist and editor at The Zero:

Asked what motivated him to become a “journalist”, Nicholas replied, “I wanted to make a difference.”

He didn’t want to report, nor to inform; he didn’t want to practice journalism at all. No, he wanted to make a difference. And that is the standard in mainstream media today.


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2 Comments

  1. daylightdisinfectant's Gravatar daylightdisinfectant
    January 15, 2012    

    Great stuff. My recent experience with the Portland Mercury has really shown me that words are important. The reporter used a word which had two meanings, and chose it for it’s deliberate ambiguity. He’s not lying, but deliberately misleading the public. As you observe, one of the things Conservatives have done well is to use the First Amendment to fight back against soft tyranny. The Libs approach to combatting our success is to attack the First Amendment in any way they can, such as through the courts and through Government Bureaucracies controlled by the Executive branch. Who will win? Time will tell. All I can say is Andrew Breitbart and James O’Keefe made a difference in my life by teaching through example how we can fight back.

  2. January 15, 2012    

    The Libs approach to combatting our success is to attack the First Amendment in any way they can, such as through the courts and through Government Bureaucracies controlled by the Executive branch.

    Interestingly, they’re the first to decry the influence of money – and first to deploy it.

    Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys.
    – P. J. O’Rourke

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