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April 2017
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REPORT: Billionaire Tom Steyer At Heart Of Kitzhaber Scandal

SteyerHeadshot

The Washington Times reports today that billionaire environmental activist Tom Steyer was connected to the off-books payment received by Cylvia Hayes that started the scandal.

In the Friday edition of the Washington times, a report has dug deep into the connections between Democratic Governor John Kitzhaber, his First Lady and environmental activist

English: Tom Steyer headshot

English: Tom Steyer headshot (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cylvia Hayes, and billionaire Tom Steyer, who has been funding a far left extreme environmental agenda for many years:

Oregon’s scandal centers around the governor’s fiancee, Cylvia Hayes, who has been acting first lady as she awaits her wedding to Mr. Kitzhaber.

While serving as an unpaid policy adviser for the governor’s office, Ms. Hayes collected $118,000 in fellowship and consulting fees from the Clean Economy Development Center, a Washington-based nonprofit, for work on low-carbon fuel standard legislation in Oregon.

Ms. Hayes never disclosed the payments on her ethics filings for the governor’s office.

The Clean Economy Development Center went out of business after the IRS pulled its tax-exempt status. Before it did, the center received funding for Ms. Hayes‘ fellowship from another nonprofit, the Energy Foundation, which in 2012 received $200,000 in funding from Mr. Steyer’s “TomKat” Charitable Trust, according to the group’s latest 990 tax form.

The Energy Foundation hired Ms. Hayes directly in 2013 for communications work, giving her a contract of $50,000, according to documents and interviews.

The web of payments, the failure to disclose and questions about influence peddling have prompted the state’s attorney general to open an ethics investigation. Republican state lawmakers also have demanded a suspension of the new fuel legislation, which would keep Oregon’s low carbon fuel standards in place instead of expiring this year.

This revelation leads to an inevitable question: why isn’t the local press probing into who bribed Kitzhaber, and for what? What influence was being peddled, and why? The media frenzy has centered around the spectacle of whether and when Kitzhaber will resign as governor.

The bigger question is, how deep does the culture of corruption go, and what agenda is driving this influence peddling scheme?

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