Telling the stories that the mainstream media no longer tell.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14 other subscribers

Archives

Categories

Follow me on Twitter

March 2017
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Oregon’s Legal Climate Driving Away Business

LawsuitStock

In the last four years, Oregon has dropped 15 places to 28th in the nation for litigation and business climate.

But until we’re in the bottom 10, don’t expect tort reform to be on the state Democrat majority’s radar.

From the Oregon Business Report:

A state’s litigation environment is an increasingly important factor in key business decisions, according to a survey conducted for the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform (ILR) by Harris Interactive. The survey was based on interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,125 in-house general counsel; senior litigators; and other senior executives who are knowledgeable about litigation matters at public and private companies with annual revenues of at least $100 million. Respondents were asked to give states a grade (A through F) in several areas: overall treatment of tort and contract litigation; having and enforcing meaningful venue requirements; treatment of class action and mass consolidation suits; damages; timeliness of summary judgment or dismissal; discovery; scientific and technical evidence; judges’ impartiality; judges’ competence; and juries’ fairness.

[…]  The 2012 State Liability Systems Ranking Study found that Oregon’s overall ranking has slipped from 13th place in 2002 to 28th place in 2012. Oregon’s specific scores are as follows:

Overall treatment of tort and contract litigation: 30th 
Having and enforcing meaningful venue requirements: 20th
Treatment of class action and mass consolidation suits: 35th
Damages: 30th
Timeliness of summary judgment or dismissal: 28th
Discovery: 26th
Scientific and technical evidence: 28th
Judges’ impartiality: 27th
Judges’ competence: 24th
Juries’ fairness: 29th

Read more at the Oregon Business Report

Legal Climate: How Oregon compares to other states

Medical malpractice reforms: One Rx for Oregon

Similar posts

1 Comment

  1. Why they shouldn't have more protection's Gravatar Why they shouldn't have more protection
    December 20, 2012    

    Physicians engage in a code of silence.

    It is a misdemeanor for Oregon physicians to not report unprofessional conduct, but no physician will report a colleague and the law is not being followed. Any doctor who discloses medical damage or fraud to a patient will be ostracized. White collar crime is protected and difficult to expose.

    The Death Doctor, Dr. Patel, who fled to Australia to avoid prosecution for killing and irreparably damaging patients with incompetent surgery was protected by colleagues and hospitals where he practiced. A young woman doctor who warned a patient not to go to Dr. Patel was forced out by Portland’s medical community.

    Despite reports to the Oregon Medical Board, the hospital and FBI, a local surgeon who fraudulently obtained consent to do unnecessary surgery and broke many laws is still practicing, getting referrals and making a upwards of a million dollars a year.

    The medical industry is highly lucrative, creates enormous wealth for physicians and hospitals and is well insulated. Doctors and hospitals protect themselves and bad doctors. The consequence is higher insurance rates, higher medical costs and bad outcomes.

    Until the Oregon Medical Board and the medical community follow existing law, report and prosecute doctors who commit crimes and damage their patients, consumers need every legal recourse available and should not be restricted.

    Doctors need to be held accountable and consumers need protection.

This site sponsored by:

YOU! Your message could reach thousands of online consumers. Click CONTACT to inquire about advertising rates.

Paid advertisement

  • Washington responds to House pulling the AHCA March 24, 2017
    Speaker of the House Paul Ryan conceded Friday that there are not enough votes to pass the American Health Care Act through his chamber. Ryan needed 216 votes to pass the legislation that would repeal the Affordable Care Act and replace it with a system of flat tax credits dispersed to residents based on age, […]
  • Press Release: O’Ban, Rossi say Sound Transit move to engage misses mark March 24, 2017
    The Sound Transit board passed a motion today to authorize its CEO “to continue communications and engagement with the State Legislature” in order to “pursue options to address public concerns” about its inflated car tab tax calculation method.  Sens. Steve O’Ban and Dino Rossi said the premise of the motion does not address the public […]
  • Republicans share their budget proposal, but don’t expect a deal anytime soon March 23, 2017
    The Republican Senate majority unveiled its proposed budget for the 2017-2019 biennium this week. The $43.3 billion plan to fund state government includes $1.8 billion in new money for schools, spending more than 50 percent of the state budget on education for the first time since the 1980s. Senate plan spends over 50% of state […]
  • Backstabbing in the Self-Driving Car Industry March 24, 2017
    Bloomberg has a long article about Google’s lawsuit against Uber over self-driving car technology. In a nutshell, one of Google’s top engineers, Anthony Levandowski, left Google to start a new company called Otto that was then purchased by Uber for $700 million, and Google is accusing Levandowski of taking its company secrets with him and […]
  • Transit Ridership Down 2.3% in 2016 March 23, 2017
    With little fanfare, the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) released its fourth quarter 2016 ridership report last week. When ridership goes up, the lobby group usually issues a big press release ballyhooing the importance of transit (and transit subsidies). But 2016 ridership fell, so there was no press release. The report showed that light-rail ridership […]
  • Did Nader Really Call Apple a Monopoly? March 22, 2017
    “Consumer advocate Ralph Nader, concerned about fake news prevalent on social media sites, believes Congress should weigh in with antitrust legislation targeting Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Apple,” reports the Washington Examiner. Say what? Just what do Microsoft and Apple have to do with so-called fake news? How are any of these companies monopolies? Is Ralph […]