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February 2017
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Oregon’s Legal Climate Driving Away Business

LawsuitStock

In the last four years, Oregon has dropped 15 places to 28th in the nation for litigation and business climate.

But until we’re in the bottom 10, don’t expect tort reform to be on the state Democrat majority’s radar.

From the Oregon Business Report:

A state’s litigation environment is an increasingly important factor in key business decisions, according to a survey conducted for the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform (ILR) by Harris Interactive. The survey was based on interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,125 in-house general counsel; senior litigators; and other senior executives who are knowledgeable about litigation matters at public and private companies with annual revenues of at least $100 million. Respondents were asked to give states a grade (A through F) in several areas: overall treatment of tort and contract litigation; having and enforcing meaningful venue requirements; treatment of class action and mass consolidation suits; damages; timeliness of summary judgment or dismissal; discovery; scientific and technical evidence; judges’ impartiality; judges’ competence; and juries’ fairness.

[…]  The 2012 State Liability Systems Ranking Study found that Oregon’s overall ranking has slipped from 13th place in 2002 to 28th place in 2012. Oregon’s specific scores are as follows:

Overall treatment of tort and contract litigation: 30th 
Having and enforcing meaningful venue requirements: 20th
Treatment of class action and mass consolidation suits: 35th
Damages: 30th
Timeliness of summary judgment or dismissal: 28th
Discovery: 26th
Scientific and technical evidence: 28th
Judges’ impartiality: 27th
Judges’ competence: 24th
Juries’ fairness: 29th

Read more at the Oregon Business Report

Legal Climate: How Oregon compares to other states

Medical malpractice reforms: One Rx for Oregon

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1 Comment

  1. Why they shouldn't have more protection's Gravatar Why they shouldn't have more protection
    December 20, 2012    

    Physicians engage in a code of silence.

    It is a misdemeanor for Oregon physicians to not report unprofessional conduct, but no physician will report a colleague and the law is not being followed. Any doctor who discloses medical damage or fraud to a patient will be ostracized. White collar crime is protected and difficult to expose.

    The Death Doctor, Dr. Patel, who fled to Australia to avoid prosecution for killing and irreparably damaging patients with incompetent surgery was protected by colleagues and hospitals where he practiced. A young woman doctor who warned a patient not to go to Dr. Patel was forced out by Portland’s medical community.

    Despite reports to the Oregon Medical Board, the hospital and FBI, a local surgeon who fraudulently obtained consent to do unnecessary surgery and broke many laws is still practicing, getting referrals and making a upwards of a million dollars a year.

    The medical industry is highly lucrative, creates enormous wealth for physicians and hospitals and is well insulated. Doctors and hospitals protect themselves and bad doctors. The consequence is higher insurance rates, higher medical costs and bad outcomes.

    Until the Oregon Medical Board and the medical community follow existing law, report and prosecute doctors who commit crimes and damage their patients, consumers need every legal recourse available and should not be restricted.

    Doctors need to be held accountable and consumers need protection.

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