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February 2016
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Obama’s War on History

Philadelphia-LancasterTurnpikeThere are a number of things about Obama that bug me. Foremost that he’s president–but that’s not really his fault, is it?

But what perhaps bugs me the most is his ongoing War on History–constantly distorting and twisting and misinterpreting it. And usually to distort the importance of government.

Take a listen: I Spy Minute for Tuesday Jan 22, 2013. Or read the transcript, below…

@iSpyRadioShow #iSpyMin

 

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Obama has a war on history—constantly distorting government’s role and importance.

Like this from his 2nd inaugural speech:

“Together, we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce.”

Actually, railroads were originally built by private industry—entrepreneurs who took great financial risk. It was only after the entrepreneurs proved their value that the government came along.

The same for highways. The best roads were built and paid for by private companies who then charged tolls to use them.

The Philadelphia and Lancaster Turnpike was the first in 1792. From 1800 to 1830, private industry built more than 10,000 miles of roads. Relatively speaking, it was a larger effort than Eisenhower’s interstate system.

After the competition of railroads and steamboats, they shut down less profitable roads or turned them over to the government.

Government is not the answer. Let’s remember, King George had a highly efficient government and we threw that off. That is our history.

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1 Comment

  1. skinnercitycyclist's Gravatar skinnercitycyclist
    February 23, 2013    

    Government was certainly the answer when it came to transportation. Sure, private railroads laid the rails, but with massive land grants from public lands by the federal government. And when the president refers to roads, he undoubtedly means the interstate highway system, built and (these days barely) maintained by the federal government. And in case you missed it, the Constitution specifically mandates the federal building and maintenance of roads (Art I, Sec 8). The interpretation of that has evolved over the years, but the original framers of the constitution obviously had a federal role in such in mind.

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