Telling the stories that the mainstream media no longer tell.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 15 other subscribers

Archives

Categories

Follow me on Twitter

February 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29  

Northwest Coal Train Fight – The Modern Day Spotted Owl | FreedomWorks

Northern_Spotted_Owl.USFWS-thumb

For the past several years, coal industry officials have been attempting to secure approval to ship coal from Pacific Northwest ports to expanding markets in Asia. This would entail approval

English: Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidenta...

English: Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina). Six Rivers National Forest, NW California (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

to increase rail shipments from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana to new or greatly expanded terminals in Washington and Oregon. Industry officials state that this would bring thousands of living wage jobs to the region, giving a shot in the arm to an area of the country where the industrial and manufacturing base has lagged for many years, and where the unemployment rate consistently ranks above the national average.

These new terminals are opposed by a wide swath of environmental groups who have made the coal train cause the modern day equivalent of the Spotted Owl fight that decimated the natural resources industries in Oregon in the 90s. This comparison is appropriate, because the fight against coal trains, if successful, will deny economic opportunity to thousands of Pacific Northwest families, and is equally based in faulty or misleading science.

The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest coal mining area in the United States. PRB coal is noted for its low sulfur and ash content, meaning that it burns much cleaner than Appalachian coal. The basin also contains major deposits of petroleum, methane and uranium – in other words, it’s one of those naturally occuring areas of economic potential, like the Bakken Formation, that make other countries jealous of us. Around 50% of domestic electricity production comes from coal, and 40% of that is powered by PRB coal. In addition to firing our domestic production, as developing economies in Asia grow, they are looking for affordable options for powering their electrical grids. The price per kilowatt hour to produce electricity from coal is a fraction of the cost of most other sources (excluding natural gas), making it an attractive choice for emerging economies.

Coal cars in Ashtabula, Ohio (taken Sept. 26, ...

Coal cars in Ashtabula, Ohio (taken Sept. 26, 2004) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So if it’s a cleaner burning coal and it lowers costs for consumers, why would environmentalists oppose it?

The short answer is that they’ve waged a war on coal, and they want to kill the industry altogether.

Read the rest of this post at FreedomWorks:

Northwest Coal Train Fight – The Modern Day Spotted Owl | FreedomWorks.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Similar posts

2 Comments

  1. MaxRedline's Gravatar MaxRedline
    April 29, 2013    

    It’s worth noting, as I frequently have, that not only is PRB coal seemingly limitless in terms of abundance, it is also the “cleanest” coal on the planet. The opposition from professional alarmists is counterproductive not only in that it would deny economic benefits to people in the Pacific Northwest, but their dog-in-the-manger approach (we’re not going to burn it, but nobody else can, either) guarantees that China, India, South Korea, Japan, and other countries will purchase “dirtier” coal from elsewhere.

    The Pacific Northwest will receive the emissions from those plants in any case; the choice is whether we receive low-sulfur emissions, from PRB coal or high-sulfur emissions from coal acquired elsewhere. High-sulfur emissions, it may be recalled, are associated with increased acidity in precipitation (acid rain, acid snow). Moreover, PRB coal is also low in mercury; coal from other sources is substantially higher in mercury content.

    The professional alarmists are, therefore, demanding that there be no jobs in the Pacific Northwest related to the movement of PRB coal while insisting that we accept significantly greater environmental effects due to heightened sulfur and mercury emissions.

    • admin's Gravatar admin
      April 29, 2013    

      My best friend from college is fond of pointing out that those who oppose trading our natural resources with other countries and helping them achieve economic freedom have the greatest negative effect on emerging economies in countries with brown people. It is classic institutional racism, and they go absolutely apoplectic when you call them on it.

This site sponsored by:

YOU! Your message could reach thousands of online consumers. Click CONTACT to inquire about advertising rates.

Paid advertisement

  • Washington Liquor Privatization Continues To Drive Sales To Oregon, Idaho February 9, 2016
    At ten stores near the Oregon-Washington state line the increases from 2011 to 2013 ranged between 17 to 67 percent, with most at doing at least 30 percent more business. Those boosts in sales were sustained through fiscal year 2015, the most recent year of data available. The Washington State price increases were largely due […]
  • Education Reform Is Not That Popular, But It’s Still Working February 9, 2016
    A new study from the University of Virginia and Stanford finds that the IMPACT system improved student performance significantly. Specifically, when teachers rated effective under IMPACT replaced teachers rated ineffective, student achievement rose. Confounding the predictions of the critics, the system has proven successful at identifying good and bad teachers. The post Education Reform Is […]
  • Bipartisan Thinking on Voter Registration Is Welcome February 9, 2016
    Automatic voter registration is a new idea — and a good one where it can work. The states of Oregon and California have gone that route recently. They automatically register non-voters at the time they are given driver licenses. In Washington, it’s a lot trickier to create a streamlined voter-registration system using driver licensing. Not […]
  • Today’s Top 3 International Stories: Syria, Turkey & Zika February 1, 2016
    1) After an entire week’s delay, Syrian opposition finally in Geneva for UN-run peace talks, despite a suicide attack by ISIS over the weekend which killed over 40 people. The UN hopes to find agreements on humanitarian aid and prisoner exchanges, but any progress, no matter how small, will be a victory at this point. […]
  • Today’s Top 3 International Stories: Russia, Syria & the Refugee Crisis January 28, 2016
    1) Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has called for a new “Reset” with the West, erasing the previous U.S. Reset on Russian relations under Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2009. Lavrov made clear that the reset would take place on Moscow’s terms and would ignore many contentious issues with the U.S. such as the […]
  • Today’s Top 3 International Stories: Syria, Cameroon & Denmark January 26, 2016
    1) ISIS has claimed a suicide attack in Homs, Syria, which killed at least 24 people. The double explosion, caused by a jihadist wearing a suicide vest and a car bomb, wounded more than 100 people in the government-controlled city. The bombing is another example of continued violence in Syria despite the UN’s announcement of […]
  • A Streetcar Plan Grows in Brooklyn February 9, 2016
    New York is far denser than any other large American city, with an average of 27,000 people per square mile compared with 2,500 to 4,000 for most American cities. Although the city is criss-crossed by an extensive subway system, there are still some neighborhoods that are more than half a mile from a subway station. […]
  • Double the Gas Tax for Green Transportation February 8, 2016
    For most of Obama’s years as president, he has opposed raising the gas tax. Now, in his last, lame-duck year, he is proposing a $10 per barrel tax on oil. Since a 42-gallon barrel of oil produces about 45 gallons of gasoline, Diesel, jet fuel, and other products, this is roughly equal to a 22 […]
  • 2014 Transit Data February 5, 2016
    In mid-December, the Federal Transit Administration posted 2014 transit data on line, then withdrew it–but not before the Antiplanner was able to download most of the data tables. Two tables that were not available then were “Service” (including such things as vehicle revenue miles, passenger miles, and average daily trips) and “Vehicle Inventory” (including the […]