Telling the stories that the mainstream media no longer tell.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14 other subscribers

Archives

Categories

Follow me on Twitter

February 2017
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728  

Federal Budget Priorities

Federal Budget Spending

Federal Budget SpendingThe sequester continues to be a golden opportunity for conservatives to talk about principles of smaller government.

Aside from that, budgets are very revealing. And cutting the budget isn’t bad because it forces you to reexamine your spending–in other words, prioritize. That being the case, budgets can also reveal where your priorities are.

Take a listen: I Spy Minute for Wed March 6, 2013. Or read the transcript, below.

 

Follow Mark on Twitter @iSpyRadioShow

#       #       #

The sequester is a golden opportunity for conservatives because it demonstrates why you can’t and shouldn’t count on government.

Budget cuts are not bad. They force you to prioritize your spending.

For example, we constantly hear politicians say how important small businesses are to the economy. And they are. Small businesses represent over 99% of all corporations and generate 70% of net new jobs.

You’d think something that everyone agrees is that important to the economy would get a lot of attention.

So with a budget of 3 point 8 trillion, what would you guess the White House wants to spend on the Small Business Administration?

Nine hundred forty nine million. Less than one billion.

How insignificant is that? For every penny spent elsewhere you’d have to chop a penny into ten thousand pieces and spend two and a half of those itty bitty pieces on small business.

But don’t worry! If you can’t find a job, the White House wants to spend $1.1 billion on the [National] Corporation for Community Service.

Similar posts

1 Comment

  1. Kathleen's Gravatar Kathleen
    March 13, 2013    

    I visited a federal Small Business Administration office and picked up armloads of glossy magazines and pamphets giving support and instructions for starting and operating businesses in Spanish. I wonder how much that cost the taxpayers.

This site sponsored by:

YOU! Your message could reach thousands of online consumers. Click CONTACT to inquire about advertising rates.

Paid advertisement

  • State senator asks U.S. AG to intervene in King County’s safe-injection site plan February 17, 2017
    As King County officials work to open two safe-injection sites, state Sen. Mark Miloscia, R-Federal Way, is working at the state and federal level to block the sites. Miloscia’s bill that would ban sites where heroin users can safely inject around medical professionals, has passed out of committee, according to a press release from his office. […]
  • Column: Doug Ericksen is being too cute by half February 17, 2017
    The idea that someone can serve as a sitting state senator during the legislative session and hold down a full-time job on the side is ludicrous on its face to anyone remotely familiar with the duties of a state legislator. That’s why there has been no shortage of critiques of Sen. Doug Ericksen, R-Ferndale, attempting […]
  • Column: Inslee and the White House, or why we have a federal system February 17, 2017
    The parlor game of thinking through future elections can be entertaining.  I advocated for Jay Inslee to run for President in 2015, for example, in a column that drew private comments from both my left and my right of the “Are you serious?” sort. And, with the recent court battles led by AG Bob Ferguson […]
  • Congestion Cost U.S. $295 Billion in 2016 February 21, 2017
    Speaking of congestion (as the Antiplanner was yesterday), a new congestion scorecard from Inrix estimates that congestion cost America $295 billion in 2016, which is more than 1.5 percent of 2016 GDP. Where the Texas Transportation Institute’s previous estimates of congestion costs counted only the cost to commuters, Inrix adds costs to consumers who must […]
  • Good News and Bad News February 20, 2017
    Good news: The United States had 56,000 structurally deficient bridges in 2016. That’s good news because the number in 2015 was nearly 59,000. In fact, the number has declined in every year since 1992 (the earliest year for which records are available), when it was 124,000. The American Road and Transportation Builders thinks 2016’s number […]
  • The Economic Implications of Housing Supply February 17, 2017
    A new paper with the above title by urban economists Edward Glaeser and Joseph Gyourko provides more evidence to back up the Antiplanner’s recent paper on the New Feudalism. One of the major points of that paper was that the Obama administration’s plan to force suburbs to relax zoning codes to allow higher density housing […]